Foodie Wiki Walk – Everyday Foods

We all know comfort food. Most comfort foods remind us of some sense of “home.” It satisfies us, physically or emotionally.

Comfort Food, to me, is more associated with the process, of eating or preparing food, than to the particular food, itself. Pure culture.

I do not believe that all comfort food is simple to prepare. Sometimes its the preparation that makes or brings back a memory.

I think this is why we associate food with events and holidays, too.

Particular foods define us. They tell a story of where we live or where we are from.. they are Everyday Foods.

I’ve often commented that Hummus is just another culture’s bean dip.

The word, Hummus, itself, always seemed exotic, to me. I guess I thought it would be complicated, to make.. or would taste strange.. I have yet to make it, by the way.

It really is bean dip, though.

I grew up in southern California, where everyday food was beans, salsa, and tortillas. Tortillaria’s were very common, where I grew up, so I never learned to make tortillas. (I still haven’t done this, by the way.) I remember standing, many hours, in my young lifetime, on the sidewalk, watching millions of tortilla’s being made, through a big window. Back when people were the machines.

There is something very comforting and warm, in a big pot of beans. Pinto beans, with a lot of onion, where I grew up.

My mom would add Ox Tails or Ham Hocks, to the beans, if she found them, on sale. I could live the rest of my life and never see another cooked Ox Tail or Ham Hock and be just peachy.

My great grandma also added a splash of vinegar, to her bowl of pinto beans, which was an unusual treat, to me. I don’t find that much different than the lemon juice added to fuul. I wonder, however, if this was a tradition passed down to her. Is this common in other countries? (Like malt vinegar on french fries?)

Ful is one of the National foods of Egypt. Somehow, my Egyptian friend’s do not think I can stomach Ful. I admit that I’ve never had a Fava Bean. I don’t think we ever ate a bowl of beans, for breakfast, either. But, the bowl of beans, that I remember, looks just like the bowl of Ful medames, in that wiki photo.

I can’t seem to not associate Falafel with Hummus. How could chickpeas taste different than oh… chickpeas? Of course, we always called them Garbanzo beans, and I really only ate them on a salad, cold, from a salad bar, in a restaurant.

The biggest benefit, when I lived in a military housing community, in San Diego, was the diversity of the people. With the people came different foods. One of my friend’s found great amusement in my joy of eating Lima beans. It was the “pot of beans” where she grew up.

I don’t know why I had never eaten lima beans. They seemed as simple as pinto beans. Her simple food was glorious, to me. I’m weird, like that.

I lived in Jacksonville, Florida, and was almost thirty years old, before I ever asked, “What is Succotash?” It was on a menu. It was also the first time I learned about Greens, too.

I also lived in Jacksonville, when I learned how to cook black-eyed peas. I’ve had some very good and some very bad black-eyed peas. If you do not like black-eyed peas, I’d encourage you to try them again and again. (Unless, of course, you don’t like beans, at all.) Always consider your cook. I almost never would trust a restaurant to teach me something real, about new foods.

Greens are not much different than what I assume (I know this is not a good thing.) Molokheya will be like. But I also heard that Molokheya is slimey, so maybe Okra would be a better thought.

I want to try more Greens. I suppose I desire to try someone’s “tried and true” recipes. Or I could attend events or gatherings, where people, I trust, can introduce me, a little at a time.

The first time I had returned to San Diego, after eating okra, I went to the grocery store, to find it, so I could prepare it, for my mother. Okra is not common there. I tried several stores, and finally found a bag of frozen whole okra. I didn’t even know what to do with that, so I didn’t buy it. *giggle* My mom finally was able to try fried okra, at a Sonny’s BBQ, on vacation, in Orlando. How I would “fry” it and how it is served, in restaurant’s is completely different. I rather like it the way a fiend of mine ruined it, once.

I was not raised with biscuits and gravy, either. My mother did not make gravy. Ever. She always called me, into the kitchen, when it was time to make some type of gravy, for a meal.

I wasn’t really raised with white rice or grits. I had grits, for the first time, with my dad, when I was eighteen years old. My dad believes that grits should always be eaten with scrambled eggs and a lot of ground pepper. I think I like them, best, in a casserole type way, with lots of cheese.

I’ve had hominy in chili. Always from a can, though. I keep buying polenta, in that fancy tube, and yet I’m afraid to slice it and fry it. I think that’s what you are supposed to do, with it.

No one, in my family, really baked bread. If given a choice, I would eat yeast bread, over chocolate, for dessert. I’m especially fond of sopapilla’s. Sopapilla’s remind me of what I think Indian Fry Bread would taste like, if sweetened. An Indian Taco reminds me of the flat bread associated with Gyros.

(Gyros, like Guacamole, has a silent G. Say it with me. Yee-roh. G, in Spanish, sounds like H, in the English language. The best way to describe how to pronounce the beginning of Guacamole, is “wa,” but I think “hwa” is closer. Of course, if you are in a restaurant, your server may not understand you, if you pronounce either of them correctly.*smile* )

There was always bread “drying” at my Grandma Willis’ house. Always. Grandma grew up, during the Great Depression, and just couldn’t throw anything out. Really. But, my grandma made the best bread pudding, on this planet. But, o’mygosh, go look at that photo of Austin Leslie’s Creole Bread Pudding with Vanilla Whiskey Sauce.

(I’m saddened to see more loss from Hurrican Katrina, as I do some research, about this bread pudding. I wonder if this recipe is included in Mr. Leslie’s cookbook. I did find some sauce recipes here,though. I’m going to try to make this bread pudding.)

Some of my favorite dishes, that my exchange students, from Japan, taught me how to cook, were so very simple and yet wonderful. Korroke is mashed potato balls, with chopped onion, grated carrot, and some ground meat. The balls are battered with flour/egg/panko and fried.

In the United States, we call them Croquettes.

The other Japanese “home-type” food was Okinomiyaki. (“Osaka Soul Food”) Savory pancakes, is the best way to describe it. My boy really likes it. I just, recently, told him that there is cabbage, bean sprouts, and sweet potatoes, in the variation I prepare. Mom’s can be so evil, sometimes.

Wiki calls many of these foods, Peasant Foods. Some of them are called Soul Food. I just call them “home food” or “everyday food.”

My Pico de gallo is not all much different looking, than someone’s Israeli Salad.

My spaghetti is not much different looking, than someone’s Kushari.

My grandma’s “goulash” is exactly someone else’s “macaroni/beef” and someone else’s “slumgully.” I think, Chef Boyardee had something, like this, in mind, too. Okay, maybe not. *smile* I like to think that Chef Boyardee and Kellogg did have good intentions, at one time.

My grandma’s beenie weenies were very basic, and almost boring. In small quantities, they are memories on a plate. Very simple.. baked pork n beans, hot dogs, and commodity American cheese. It doesn’t get anymore boring, than this. Only my mother and I have discussed secretly still eating it, this way, once in a while. Not that we have commodity American cheese, or anything.

All of these foods are Someone’s home food. Someone’s comfort food. Someone’s everyday food.

Stay tuned, as each of my treasured peasant foods become blog posts.

2 Responses to Foodie Wiki Walk – Everyday Foods
  1. Danno
    November 6, 2008 | 10:08 pm

    Here is Austin Leslie’s Bread Pudding Recipe from the Chez Helene Cookbook. It is the same recipe as his later cookbook.

    I hate to hear about folks losing their recipes, along with everything else that was lost during Katrina.

    Here is the recipe:

    Ruby’s Bread Pudding with Rum Sauce

    1 loaf stale French bread
    1/4 lb butter
    1/4 lb raisins
    3 eggs, beaten
    1/4 cup light brown sugar
    1 can evaporated milk
    1 1/4 cups sugar
    1 small can crushed pineapple
    3 Tbsp. vanilla extract
    1/2 tsp nutmeg

    Preheat oven to 350 F. Wet the bread and squeeze the water out of it, Melt the butter and mix with all other ingredients. Pour mixture into a well buttered 8 X 11 inch baking pan. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until a knife in the center comes out clean. Serves 8.

    Rum Sauce

    3/4 Cup butter (room temperature)
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    2 oz. white rum

    Whip butter until light and gradually add the sugar until the mixture is fluffy. Next, add rum and beat several minutes more. Refrigerate. Serve over warm pudding.

  2. CarolinaDreamz
    November 7, 2008 | 12:11 am

    Thank you, so much, for sharing the recipe, with us. I appreciate your time and effort.

    ~Heidi

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Foodie Wiki Walk – Everyday Foods

We all know comfort food. Most comfort foods remind us of some sense of “home.” It satisfies us, physically or emotionally.

Comfort Food, to me, is more associated with the process, of eating or preparing food, than to the particular food, itself. Pure culture.

I do not believe that all comfort food is simple to prepare. Sometimes its the preparation that makes or brings back a memory.

I think this is why we associate food with events and holidays, too.

Particular foods define us. They tell a story of where we live or where we are from.. they are Everyday Foods.

I’ve often commented that Hummus is just another culture’s bean dip.

The word, Hummus, itself, always seemed exotic, to me. I guess I thought it would be complicated, to make.. or would taste strange.. I have yet to make it, by the way.

It really is bean dip, though.

I grew up in southern California, where everyday food was beans, salsa, and tortillas. Tortillaria’s were very common, where I grew up, so I never learned to make tortillas. (I still haven’t done this, by the way.) I remember standing, many hours, in my young lifetime, on the sidewalk, watching millions of tortilla’s being made, through a big window. Back when people were the machines.

There is something very comforting and warm, in a big pot of beans. Pinto beans, with a lot of onion, where I grew up.

My mom would add Ox Tails or Ham Hocks, to the beans, if she found them, on sale. I could live the rest of my life and never see another cooked Ox Tail or Ham Hock and be just peachy.

My great grandma also added a splash of vinegar, to her bowl of pinto beans, which was an unusual treat, to me. I don’t find that much different than the lemon juice added to fuul. I wonder, however, if this was a tradition passed down to her. Is this common in other countries? (Like malt vinegar on french fries?)

Ful is one of the National foods of Egypt. Somehow, my Egyptian friend’s do not think I can stomach Ful. I admit that I’ve never had a Fava Bean. I don’t think we ever ate a bowl of beans, for breakfast, either. But, the bowl of beans, that I remember, looks just like the bowl of Ful medames, in that wiki photo.

I can’t seem to not associate Falafel with Hummus. How could chickpeas taste different than oh… chickpeas? Of course, we always called them Garbanzo beans, and I really only ate them on a salad, cold, from a salad bar, in a restaurant.

The biggest benefit, when I lived in a military housing community, in San Diego, was the diversity of the people. With the people came different foods. One of my friend’s found great amusement in my joy of eating Lima beans. It was the “pot of beans” where she grew up.

I don’t know why I had never eaten lima beans. They seemed as simple as pinto beans. Her simple food was glorious, to me. I’m weird, like that.

I lived in Jacksonville, Florida, and was almost thirty years old, before I ever asked, “What is Succotash?” It was on a menu. It was also the first time I learned about Greens, too.

I also lived in Jacksonville, when I learned how to cook black-eyed peas. I’ve had some very good and some very bad black-eyed peas. If you do not like black-eyed peas, I’d encourage you to try them again and again. (Unless, of course, you don’t like beans, at all.) Always consider your cook. I almost never would trust a restaurant to teach me something real, about new foods.

Greens are not much different than what I assume (I know this is not a good thing.) Molokheya will be like. But I also heard that Molokheya is slimey, so maybe Okra would be a better thought.

I want to try more Greens. I suppose I desire to try someone’s “tried and true” recipes. Or I could attend events or gatherings, where people, I trust, can introduce me, a little at a time.

The first time I had returned to San Diego, after eating okra, I went to the grocery store, to find it, so I could prepare it, for my mother. Okra is not common there. I tried several stores, and finally found a bag of frozen whole okra. I didn’t even know what to do with that, so I didn’t buy it. *giggle* My mom finally was able to try fried okra, at a Sonny’s BBQ, on vacation, in Orlando. How I would “fry” it and how it is served, in restaurant’s is completely different. I rather like it the way a fiend of mine ruined it, once.

I was not raised with biscuits and gravy, either. My mother did not make gravy. Ever. She always called me, into the kitchen, when it was time to make some type of gravy, for a meal.

I wasn’t really raised with white rice or grits. I had grits, for the first time, with my dad, when I was eighteen years old. My dad believes that grits should always be eaten with scrambled eggs and a lot of ground pepper. I think I like them, best, in a casserole type way, with lots of cheese.

I’ve had hominy in chili. Always from a can, though. I keep buying polenta, in that fancy tube, and yet I’m afraid to slice it and fry it. I think that’s what you are supposed to do, with it.

No one, in my family, really baked bread. If given a choice, I would eat yeast bread, over chocolate, for dessert. I’m especially fond of sopapilla’s. Sopapilla’s remind me of what I think Indian Fry Bread would taste like, if sweetened. An Indian Taco reminds me of the flat bread associated with Gyros.

(Gyros, like Guacamole, has a silent G. Say it with me. Yee-roh. G, in Spanish, sounds like H, in the English language. The best way to describe how to pronounce the beginning of Guacamole, is “wa,” but I think “hwa” is closer. Of course, if you are in a restaurant, your server may not understand you, if you pronounce either of them correctly.*smile* )

There was always bread “drying” at my Grandma Willis’ house. Always. Grandma grew up, during the Great Depression, and just couldn’t throw anything out. Really. But, my grandma made the best bread pudding, on this planet. But, o’mygosh, go look at that photo of Austin Leslie’s Creole Bread Pudding with Vanilla Whiskey Sauce.

(I’m saddened to see more loss from Hurrican Katrina, as I do some research, about this bread pudding. I wonder if this recipe is included in Mr. Leslie’s cookbook. I did find some sauce recipes here,though. I’m going to try to make this bread pudding.)

Some of my favorite dishes, that my exchange students, from Japan, taught me how to cook, were so very simple and yet wonderful. Korroke is mashed potato balls, with chopped onion, grated carrot, and some ground meat. The balls are battered with flour/egg/panko and fried.

In the United States, we call them Croquettes.

The other Japanese “home-type” food was Okinomiyaki. (“Osaka Soul Food”) Savory pancakes, is the best way to describe it. My boy really likes it. I just, recently, told him that there is cabbage, bean sprouts, and sweet potatoes, in the variation I prepare. Mom’s can be so evil, sometimes.

Wiki calls many of these foods, Peasant Foods. Some of them are called Soul Food. I just call them “home food” or “everyday food.”

My Pico de gallo is not all much different looking, than someone’s Israeli Salad.

My spaghetti is not much different looking, than someone’s Kushari.

My grandma’s “goulash” is exactly someone else’s “macaroni/beef” and someone else’s “slumgully.” I think, Chef Boyardee had something, like this, in mind, too. Okay, maybe not. *smile* I like to think that Chef Boyardee and Kellogg did have good intentions, at one time.

My grandma’s beenie weenies were very basic, and almost boring. In small quantities, they are memories on a plate. Very simple.. baked pork n beans, hot dogs, and commodity American cheese. It doesn’t get anymore boring, than this. Only my mother and I have discussed secretly still eating it, this way, once in a while. Not that we have commodity American cheese, or anything.

All of these foods are Someone’s home food. Someone’s comfort food. Someone’s everyday food.

Stay tuned, as each of my treasured peasant foods become blog posts.

2 Responses to Foodie Wiki Walk – Everyday Foods
  1. Danno
    November 6, 2008 | 10:08 pm

    Here is Austin Leslie’s Bread Pudding Recipe from the Chez Helene Cookbook. It is the same recipe as his later cookbook.

    I hate to hear about folks losing their recipes, along with everything else that was lost during Katrina.

    Here is the recipe:

    Ruby’s Bread Pudding with Rum Sauce

    1 loaf stale French bread
    1/4 lb butter
    1/4 lb raisins
    3 eggs, beaten
    1/4 cup light brown sugar
    1 can evaporated milk
    1 1/4 cups sugar
    1 small can crushed pineapple
    3 Tbsp. vanilla extract
    1/2 tsp nutmeg

    Preheat oven to 350 F. Wet the bread and squeeze the water out of it, Melt the butter and mix with all other ingredients. Pour mixture into a well buttered 8 X 11 inch baking pan. Bake for 40 to 50 minutes or until a knife in the center comes out clean. Serves 8.

    Rum Sauce

    3/4 Cup butter (room temperature)
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    2 oz. white rum

    Whip butter until light and gradually add the sugar until the mixture is fluffy. Next, add rum and beat several minutes more. Refrigerate. Serve over warm pudding.

  2. CarolinaDreamz
    November 7, 2008 | 12:11 am

    Thank you, so much, for sharing the recipe, with us. I appreciate your time and effort.

    ~Heidi

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Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

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